Educake and JISC, Digital Lunchtime Lectures

I’m playing catch-up this week as I didn’t have time to write one last week. Today you get not one but two Digital Lunchtime Lectures in one blog post, a rogue blog post as it was dubbed by Helena Markou on Twitter (@helena_markou). I should probably explain, these lectures receive the official blog treatment from other MA students over at the Brookes Publishing website (though the posts themselves are proving to be elusive…), I, then, am a sneaky blogger. A rogue. A vigilante blogger, if you will.

I am getting carried away. I should get on with the blog entry now.

Educake

Educake is a new start-up aiding teachers with the teaching of GCSE Science, with the hopes of expanding across other courses. Last week we were joined by Charley Darbishire, the founder of the company, who took us through the process of creating the product (both the what and the why). We were given an inside look at how it worked as well as some of the costs involved.

Not only did he detail the start-up but his career before Educake and the transition between being employed and working for himself, he also gave us some juicy tidbits about getting into publishing. (Always a plus!)

See the official blog about this talk here.

JISC

Today we were visited by Paul Harwood from JISC and were brought up to speed on the ever-growing world of Open Access. As far as journals go, I know a little but not a lot, my knowledge of Open Access before this talk was essentially that it exists, as well as a few highlights I’d read from the Finch Report. (I am a terrible Publishing Enthusiast for this, I know, but I am learning!)

I was, however, familiar with JISC before this lecture (very much because Ruth is currently an intern with them) so I do not fail on all accounts.

The lecture detailed the problems facing publishers with the growth of OA, particularly with focus to the Finch Report and the move by the Government to ensure that all research which is publicly funded is available to be read by anyone without needing a subscription. This is creating all sorts of publishing models to ensure the best result for both the publisher and the author (and in part the institution the author belongs to).

He spoke at length about the Gold model (points which I will summarise in an edit of this post as I idiotically left my notes at home – I am not at home) but less about the Green model, which I gather is more of a move away from publishers. (Do not quote me on this.) I can only assume that this is because the Gold model is perhaps newer than the Green.

Harwood’s lecture focused mainly on the UK implications of OA with a small mention of Europe. It summarised the UK’s position in terms of research (how much of the global research pool was/is provided by Britons) and I was surprised to see how great it was (compared to our share of the world’s population).

Anyway, as I lack my notes I can’t say much more on this but I was much impressed by this lunchtime’s Digital Lunchtime Lecture. Look out on Twitter next Wednesday for the next in the series (follow #DLL13).

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