Review: Practical Magic by Alice Hoffman

practical-magic-9781471169199_lgAs children, sisters Gillian and Sally were forever outsiders in their small New England town, teased, taunted and shunned for the air of magic that seems to sparkle in the air around them. All Gillian and Sally ever wanted was to get away.

And eventually they do – one marries, the other runs as far from home as she can manage.

Years later, however, tragedy will bring the sisters back together. And they’ll find that no matter what else may happen, they’ll always have each other.


I finished a book! Can you believe it? I can’t. I am shocked. Shocked, I tell you. Hopefully, this spells the end of my reading slump. I’m going to try starting another book this evening and we shall see what happens.

Practical Magic is a book I’ve been wanting to read for yonks. Ever since I first saw and fell in love with the film, I’ve wanted to read the book. I am glad I saw the film first – I may not have read the book if the film stuck more closely to it (and I really liked the book so it would have been a shame to miss out on it).

I’m not one of those people who despair if a book-movie deviates from the source material. I view the two as separate entities that I can enjoy individually (the exception here is Inkheart, while I do enjoy the film and will happily watch it, I am very sad that they didn’t allow for the whole trilogy to be turned into films because the later books were incredible), and most of the time I understand why a change had to be made.

Practical Magic the film and Practical Magic the book are very, very different to one another. They share characters and the main conflict but otherwise, they’re different stories. I think it was a great choice for the directors and writers and film people (whoever makes that decision) as the film does add drama that was lacking in the book. The book is a slow burner, it really enjoys exploring the characters more than it does plot, the prose is delicious and it wanders off in directions you would not expect having read the previous paragraph.

I really adored the characters, they were all irrational and flawed and irritating and three dimensional. I love a character that I don’t automatically like. One of the major differences in the film is the age of Sally’s children, in the book they’re both teenagers and the book focusses as much on their relationship with each other as it does the relationship between Sally and Gillian. This is a book about relationships, story and magic are secondary. It’s very much a character-led book.

It weaves magic without making it too showy, there’s no wand waving (except from one of the characters who happens to be a stage magician, I liked that touch) but instead just little things, little bits of intuition and the odd bird heart.

Even though it’s not story-heavy, it left me wanting more; luckily for me, there is a prequel! (A prequel with an equally gorgeous cover design.) It’s not out in paperback until September so I will have to wait a little while but with the rate time is passing at the moment, by the time I wake up tomorrow it will probably be September already. I’ll definitely be giving the prequel a go, and will probably find myself reading Practical Magic again. Good stuff.

(‘the air of magic that seems to sparkle in the air around them’ – blurb-writer, what were you doing? That’s terrible. Ahem.)


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s